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If you had to do it all over again would you still become a nurse?


July 11th, 2023

YES, YES, YES! I've been an RN for 45 years and counting, and an NP for 27 of those. I adore what I do and encourage others to enter nursing as well. I'm 75+ and working on a` DNP. Retirement is a dirty word as far as I'm concerned. As long as my legs and brain hold up, I'll be practicing and teaching it. I love nursing!

February 9th, 2022

Nurse, yes…NP, no

January 4th, 2023

No. I missed out on so many things with friends and family. Plus, no matter how much you give to wherever you work, they always want more. Right now I'm not working due to my husband having a car accident where he fainted and he lost his license for 6 months. I drove him back and forth to work every day. He got it back in September and I still haven't gone back. I really don't know if I want to. I'm starting to think I'll go work in a clothing store where I can where what I want, get my nails done and go home with no worries.

March 30th, 2022

No

May 11th, 2022

This is a hard time in history & many people are becoming burned out. I started as a RN in 2012 & the world is definitely different. However, nursing has presented many wonderful opportunities for me & my family. I will always be needed in my line of work for one. I get connect with the community & a specific patient population for two. And it seems like I am presented with more opportunities the further I advance my education. I also have the knowledge to help my family when needed. I mean there are so many positives about being a nurse.

I ended up in wound care & ostomy care, but since it is so specialized & nobody seems to want to do it so I feel like I get paid more than some RNs do, more than a floor RN for sure (no bragging, I just know that I do).
With wound care & ostomy I started in home health, moved to the outpatient wound clinic, & started inpatient wound/ostomy care when COVID hit. I became a CWCN (certified wound care nurse) through the WOCNCB & I feel this has opened doors for me.

Even though certain patient populations are hard (at times) to take care of I still love taking care of people. Nursing school was the hardest thing I've ever done, but I would do it again. Don't get discouraged by how things are going today. I'd focus on what you LOVE about nursing & pursue that to its fullest. Sorry for such a long answer! Hope this helps ")

March 8th, 2023

No never. Healthcare is the worst. They don’t take care of us. There is no life/ work balance. The pay sucks. I’ve been doing this for 50 years. Still work full time in the Surgery dept. The hours are bad and after all that , I love what I do. How bad is that ??

March 30th, 2022

No

April 30th, 2023

No. I was an RN in the ER, and in the Army for 14 years before becoming a Family Nurse Practitioner. If I could have a conversation with myself 25 years ago, Id tell myself to look at a different career choice. There are two types of veteran nurses, those who love the job and those who are so vested that they are stuck in the job. I am the later. At 52, with both undergrad and graduate degrees in nursing, Im too old to look at another career. My advice; if you're young, as in your early 20's, and just statring a professional career and you have a genuine interest in nursing, then go for it. If its not for you, you still have pleanty if time to make a change. If you are in your late 30's or early 40's, and are looking at nursing as a second career, forget about it. It is a thankless and very unfullfilling career choice, full of pure BS at every level! There are better, and far easier ways to earn a similar paycheck, without all of the BS that comes with being a nurse. RN: refreshments and narcotics.

December 20th, 2023

I would have become a nurse straight out of high school in 2004 instead of working forever as a CNA2 and going back to nursing school in 2015 like an idiot!

August 14th, 2023

Maybe. Retired almost 2 years ago, due to the Covid BS, and would now never return. I did put my license on 'inactive' status at the time since renewal was just a couple months after I retired, and I wasn't sure at the time if I might want to try another aspect of it, outside of the hospital environment. Now, renewal will be coming up in just 5 months, and I will let it lapse. I have zero desire to return to it, Especially post-Covid!

Nursing school was very hard, but worth it. I learned so much..about nursing, about people, about myself. And continued learning. I graduated from a Diploma school and the teachers were great and truly loved teaching .. which I think made a huge difference. That could never be taken away, even if I had then chosen a different path, which I almost did...at several different times!

Over the years, I've worked in many areas from med-surg to ortho, critical care, ER, a burn unit and finally landing in mother-baby. Spent the last 35 years of my career there. I truly loved getting new families of to their best possible start!

The first 10 years I worked at a hospital that after a few years really became a toxic environment, administration wise. By the time I left there, Lots of nurses were leaving, and only ONE administrator wanted to know why .. he asked me to "Please share with me WHY so many nurses are leaving! We're bleeding nurses and I can't get anyone to talk to me about it .. they're just leaving!" He was the new CEO, and he came as the massive outflow was happening. I also knew his brother, who had no connection to healthcare, so maybe he felt I would be more willing to tell him, since I had also turned in my resignation. So we sat down, and I told him everything, without 'holding back'. He seemed 'surprised' at much of what I told him. He was actually taking notes! I told him that since you're fairly new to the organization, you just walked into a 'hornet's nest', and if you want to turn this sinking ship around, you're going to have to get brutally honest with yourself about what you can and can't do, and you're going to have to be making some really hard decisions, administration wise, if you stop the hemorrhaging. Since I had nothing to 'lose' so to speak, at the time, I named names, dates, instances, etc. There was a ton of nepotism, bullying, coersion, 'special favors', retaliation, etc. AND I was able to prove all of it! I 'almost' felt sorry for him, since he was a nice guy and seemed to want to do well. He asked me to Please stay and help me with this. I already had a new job, so I was interested. Too little, too late scenario. I didn't belive that he was actually going to do anything about it, but later was pleasantly surprised at some of the changes that were taking place there, many of which I suggested! Still had friends there, so I was able to get the 'updates'. ;)

Was at my next job in M/B for the next almost 33 years. The first 10-15 years were great! Good leadership, comraderie, support, communication, etc. The next 10 were a slow decline into corporate running, with nurses at the bottom of the totem pole. But I loved the people I worked with (for the most part), and we still had each other's backs. We had a really good manager, until the last 2 years when she 'turned' on us due to upper management 'pressures'. The last 3-5 were challenging at best, and were reminiscent of the one I had left prior. Uggh! When the mandates happened, I told them BYE! I was able to retire, thankfully. That last year was all about CONTROL, paranoia, lies, bullying, coersion, broken 'promises', etc. I was NOT going to deal with that again! The administration became a Nightmare! And, again, many nurses were leaving!

What 'ruined' it for me was when hospitals became more like factories. It was ALL about the satisfaction scores and how much $$ could we save. They wanted 'top notch' care, but would not give us what we actually needed to accomplish it, and many times just did things to 'sabatage' it! Paid lip-service to 'loving our employees and nurses'. Definitely would throw you under the bus if the opportunity arose. The 'extra' requirements being thrown at us on the daily, involving more paperwork, time, committees, etc that we were expected to do. The double-standards, the lies and manipulation was just more than I was willing to tolerate! It was time to go. In the last 5 years there, about 15 +/- retired or went to other positions... and these were Long-term employees with 20+ years there! In talking with my friends who are still there, soooo many of them keep saying, "you got out just in the nick of time! This roller coaster is about to derail!"

If I could have "just" taken care of my new parents the way they needed, I would have been a very happy camper and stayed. Sadly, that wasn't the case, and I'm not sure there is even a place in the U.S. where that's even possible anymore. I'm afraid this scenario is more universal and common than I'd like to admit. And it makes me very sad!

If I wanted to work again, it would be with animals. They have no hidden 'agendas', and just want to love and be loved and cared for! They pay with licks, tail wags and 'puppy dog' eyes! I have a friend who has a business doing animal transports and training and certifying dogs as service animals for flights. I'll be joining her in the next year, more than likely. :) I'll be sticking with the transportation side of it :)

February 21st, 2023

No. I worked really hard for my degree and don't get paid on an equal level to those I went to dchool with who got business or other science degrees. The curriculum at the time is much of what they now teach in NP school and I really don't use 1/2of what I learned

October 19th, 2022

After 32 years, and still practicing I would say yes.I have worked with some of the best people in the world , and a few that were not so good. The opportunity to help save lives is a gift. Overall, it has been a fine career filled with gratitude and some of the best ever people.

Jeff K RN

April 16th, 2022

Nope. I’ve learned a lot about myself in becoming a nurse and working for 12 years in various areas of nursing. But it doesn’t fill my cup!

November 14th, 2022

Absolutely, I have never been without a job. I have managed to care for myself and my family for over 30 years. Nursing school is difficult but it is definitely worth it.

April 15th, 2022

I knew I wanted to be a nurse when I was 7 years old. I have never regretted it for one moment. It is the most rewarding career and allows for the individual to pursue other specialized areas. I have been able to work in ER, cardiac, home health, long term care, and work as a surveyor for the Department of Health. I also have a certificate in Legal Nurse Consulting and Forensic Nursing. The opportunities are endless. My favorite job was working with the developmentally challenged. I am now working from home doing disability claims and love it!

March 28th, 2022

absolutely not

February 1st, 2022

Definitely! I knew I wanted to be a nurse as a child whose great great grandmother delivered most of the African American children in my community. I love how versatile the profession is. I have been at the bedside providing care, in the educational setting teaching our future nurses, and in the informatics area introducing technology to the EMR platform.

March 25th, 2022

Yes

March 30th, 2022

No.

August 29th, 2023

Absolutely not! The pay is horrible as well as the hours. I wasn’t in the hospital long because I had four kids and wanted to have some semblance of a life so I went into ambulatory surgery. While my hours were still long I didn’t have to do holidays or weekends.

Is there job security? Not always. First, if you do what I did and work in a specialty field for 20 years good luck finding a job anywhere else. As usually everyone wants at least a years worth of experience (if you transfer with in the hospital it’s a bit different). On top of that they would rather hire and train a new grad than pay you for your years of experience and retrain you. Not to mention how hard it is being of a certain age and taking orders from someone who graduated two years ago!

Also, with the direction that health care is going it’s scary to be a patient as well as a professional. Insurance is a nightmare and banks buying up private practices to consolidate and resell like some a pyramid scheme should be illegal!

With that said, I left nursing 15years ago to go into Marketing and I haven’t looked back. I made more money, didn’t worry about my license and accidentally causing harm due to being short staffed and therefore over-worked and exhausted. I made a much better salary, had a voice, decent hours and little to no stress.

If health care is still you thing… don’t stop at an RN degree or you’ll never make what you’re worth. Consider Nurse Anesthetist, Physicians Assistance or Nurse Practitioner and go on to the difficulty floors like Telemetry. If you’re going to put in the hours at least get paid fairly for them.

June 27th, 2023

That would be a definitive NO.

June 27th, 2023

Yes because i know i have job security, am able to move around to different specialties and advance my degree to a higher position. Plus i like to care for people.

May 10th, 2023

Yes, looking back...it has added unmeasurable meaning to my life

April 10th, 2023

As a second profession: YES

I’m happy I derailed my first profession to pursue healthcare. I found financial security and job security for the first time in my life. I found work with benefits and much lower job hazards.

It’s not my “calling” but no job has ever has been my “calling”. I take pride in doing my job well. Work is work, play is play.

April 15th, 2022

Personally I would not. That being said I’ve learned a lot about myself and met some phenomenal people since I started, but that doesn’t balance out in the end I don’t think.

I’ll be finished my MSN by the end of the year and I hope to transition into case management or an education position.

Find your passion and you can find your place as an RN.

March 28th, 2022

Absolutely, I can find a job in or out of the hospital, at the bedside or in research, in sales or quality control... the options are endless. All with one little nursing degree

August 24th, 2023

Yes. But not in the states. Profit over people doesn’t work in healthcare

August 13th, 2023

Absolutely, but I would move around more and not stay with one specialty.

August 13th, 2023

No. Especially not after the COVID pandemic.

June 27th, 2023

❤️❤️❤️

April 30th, 2023

Yes. Nursing was my Plan B after 17 years as a journalist. I stuck with psych and I love it.

April 1st, 2023

Yes. To be honest there are those times when Target looks very inviting but looking back over 37 years of nursing it was the best investment of time, energy and money. I have been licensed in five states and now carry a second license as a Special Services Provider for Special Education. I have always been able to support my family when my husband could not work or his pay was not enough. I have five specialties, one in which I was board certified. They developed over the years of moving around the country with my husband. When I was burned out in one specialty I always had the option of trying something new. Nursing opens doors to many different careers . I know several BSN JDs, BSN MSN PhD, NP, DNP Educators , Consultants, travel nurses etc. Nurses have the opportunity to be innovators. I proposed starting a perinatal hospice in one of my hospitals. I was fortunate that all my administrators and coworkers were supportive of me and the nurses where I worked, especially when our families needed us at home for crisis, long term illnesses or special events.
Looking back over the years of my career, and I am still going strong, the best part is remembering and sometimes meeting again the people and families that I have touched. Celebrating healthy/recovering people leaving the hospital for home, being thanked by families who lost a love one but appreciated my care and support, advocating for patients and families for better care and helping them navigate a confusing health system all help me remember why I work those long exhausting hours with short staff and less than adequate pay at times. I am a school nurse now and it is the best feeling when a student, teacher, or parent sees me in my office and say "I am so glad you are here, I know you can help me." That's why I would become a nurse all over again.

December 26th, 2022

No.
The restraints and “bottom line” are barriers to this

June 28th, 2023

Absolutely!! 1000% yes!!

October 29th, 2023

Perhaps…the first 20-25 years, it was fulfilling and enjoyable. I felt safe in my position. The last 20 years, not so much. It became a business and the nurses were expected to give all with little appreciation. RN= Refreshments and Narcotics. My last 3 years, I worked in a Drs office and realized I ravaged my body all those years (L&D)and could get the same paycheck without body fluids pouring over me, and enjoy a much more relaxed tempo.

September 29th, 2023

No.

February 21st, 2023

Maybe

January 28th, 2024

Nope

January 25th, 2024

Yes but I would decrease my expectations. Nurse for 31 years. Np for 8. Came up through the ranks CNA, LPN, BSN, MSN,NP. I've had a fulfilling career until a stroke in 2022! Love precepting.

January 25th, 2024

Yes, but I would have lower expectations

September 26th, 2023

In that proverbial "New York minute"! 45 years an RN and almost 30 of that an NP. Yes. I'd do it all over again in a heartbeat!

August 29th, 2023

Ues

August 14th, 2023

No way!!!

November 15th, 2022

The better question would be - would you still become a nurse working in your current place of employment. You see there is very little investment given to nurses in most health care organizations. Most nurses do not see their full potential, nor do they feel autonomous, appreciated or even that they have an experience worth paying for. I have worked in many organizations: Catholic Hospital, School District, Health Care Agencies, Federal Government, Health Care Organizations and University Systems. I saw great nurses leave within 2 years and not so good nurses who endured, basically because where else are they going to go, they are so miserable. Ok, i do admit some of those leaving after 2 years, left to advance their practice, but this still is sad to see. Especially, due to the loss in continuity and knowledge which could have lead to an expertise in their current hospital. Such a tragedy to see a break in novice to expert within a hospital system.

The most effective hospital was a small hospital in New Hampshire. A tier rewarded approach and the pay was outstanding. Nurses were looked at as part of the upper echelon team, not as a class system but in expertise. Nurses were expected to move from Novice to Expert. We were trained, rewarded and paid for certifications, advanced practice and PALS, ACLS, NALS, PICC,Telemetry etc. Now asked me " if you had to do it all over again would you still become a nurse"

"Be That Nurse, the one they will never forget" - me

March 25th, 2022

Yes, it is a good career, with chances to vc
Connect with other healthprofessionals and serve the community.

February 8th, 2022

Yes!

February 8th, 2022

In a heartbeat

December 24th, 2023

No

February 12th, 2024

Absolutely NO! Not that I don’t like nursing itself, but i’m sick of being the scapegoat every time when something went wrong. I lately had an experience at the hospital resulting being let go by the hospital. The reason was I failed to report patient’s deterioration and pt died. That’s a complete ass lie. I started reporting s/s to the MD, but he was being an sassy ass, nasty attitude until it was too late, he came to the floor. Pt was already in a very poor condition, too many comorbidities. Everything in the chart, the texts between me and doctor proved that I have been doing everything, reporting deterioration in time. And yet…. I don’t really care about that job but i do care all the efforts i put in pt care and i was still blamed for things that were not my fault.

January 1st, 2024

ABSOLUTELY NOT!

Unfortunately I was not given a choice of which career I wanted. My parents forced me into nursing. Their exact words were "We're paying for your education and you will be a nurse." It was non-negotiable.

If I had been able to choose I would have chosen a career in music but its' too late now. At 54 years old and 37 years of healthcare under my belt I am too old to be pursuing such a drastic career change so, I stay stuck in a career that I loathe but am good at.

December 20th, 2023

I would’ve picked nursing first right out of high school and worked on degree advancement sooner

November 21st, 2023

YES!! Except I would have done it sooner.

October 31st, 2023

nope

October 24th, 2023

No I'd finish Med School.

September 29th, 2023

Absolutely! 50 years, ICU, Hemodialysis, Hospice, teaching...loved it all.

September 29th, 2023

Absolutley. Had a great career at the local children's hospital and then went into clinical research for for the last 30 years. Now retired but keep my license up.

September 25th, 2023

Yes I will.I love what I was doing. I was a nurse for 44 years.I retired more than 2 yrs ago.I miss being a nurse.I didn't retire because got tired of if but because they won't release my pension since I'm still with them so I did.I was 66 at the time I applied for it.

September 25th, 2023

Absolutely!

September 20th, 2023

Knowing what I know now, no.

It’s been good in many ways though.

September 16th, 2023

Not sure…..

August 30th, 2023

Yes. No doubt about it. I love and like what I do being an operating room nurse.

August 29th, 2023

100%!! I really like being a nurse. I’m fortunate to work in a wonderful unit with professional, supportive management. And my colleagues (except for a few) are amazing! Plus, being in Oregon, the party is outstanding.

August 29th, 2023

100% yes!

August 29th, 2023

Absolutely - without a doubt !!!!!

August 29th, 2023

YES i would it was a calling for me!

August 29th, 2023

In a nutshell: IN A HEARTBEAT!! 45 years and RN and 27 of that an NP. Still loving it and all I've done over that time. Still hoping to finish my doctorate, even at my age. I truly believe I was put on this Earth to follow this path and am grateful every single day for it.

August 12th, 2023

nope.

April 30th, 2023

Yes

April 5th, 2023

Probably not. I'm a third generation nurse who worked as a unit secretary at 19. Didn't really know what else was out there.
If I were 18 again. I would do consulting. I went in to leadership. But as much I like my employees. Turns out my passion is strategy, implementation and performance management.
I would be making bank by now. And I think I would have been better at it.
But nursing allowed me a lifestyle most of my friends didn't have in their 20s. But by 30, they were catching up and passing me.
PS, I do like nursing leadership.

January 4th, 2023

Yes, most definitely

January 3rd, 2023

Yes definitely

December 27th, 2022

Nope.

May 9th, 2022

Maybe not, I would have wanted to be a speech pathologist because, I love the elementary children since, I have become a Nana.

March 30th, 2022

Absolutely, yes!

March 28th, 2022

No

March 25th, 2022

Yes!

February 11th, 2022

Yes

February 10th, 2022

@Michael Lewis I totally agree!